Plantar Plate Tear

Imaging sports-related injuries of the mid and forefoot complements the physical examination and clinical history. Stress fractures may be radiographically occult, in which case CT may facilitate detection, or MRI may be necessary

Ganglion The Plantar Plate Mri

Fig. 17. Sagittal 2D-GRE image (A) demonstrates pathologic elongation of the high signal zone, indicative of degenerative tearing of the plantar plate; note hyperextension of the digit at the MTP joint. (B) Complete bilateral plantar plate rupture (arrow) with dorsal dislocation of the second toe. Coronal 2D-GRE image (C) demonstrates complete rupture at the lateral insertion of the plantar plate and phalangeal collateral ligament onto the base of the second proximal phalanx (black arrow). Coronal image (D) demonstrates a ganglion (white arrow) related to a partial tear at the lateral aspect of the plantar plate.

Fig. 17. Sagittal 2D-GRE image (A) demonstrates pathologic elongation of the high signal zone, indicative of degenerative tearing of the plantar plate; note hyperextension of the digit at the MTP joint. (B) Complete bilateral plantar plate rupture (arrow) with dorsal dislocation of the second toe. Coronal 2D-GRE image (C) demonstrates complete rupture at the lateral insertion of the plantar plate and phalangeal collateral ligament onto the base of the second proximal phalanx (black arrow). Coronal image (D) demonstrates a ganglion (white arrow) related to a partial tear at the lateral aspect of the plantar plate.

for identification of marrow signal changes in the absence of discernible cortical defects. Timely detection of stress-related marrow edema may permit early clinical intervention and prevent evolution to fracture, hastening the athlete's to return to training and competition. MRI has revolutionized the evaluation of soft tissue injury with or without associated occult osseous injury. As with footwear, however, MRI of the foot is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. In most individuals, it is not possible to image the foot from heel to toe without exceeding the limits of the surface coil or compromising the quality of the examination by field inhomogeneity or failure of fat suppression. It is important to tailor the MR examination of the foot to address the specific area of clinical concern. Ideally, imaging should be focused to the region of interest, be it the hindfoot, midfoot, or forefoot, so that protocols can be optimized to permit small field of view, high-resolution imaging. This is particularly crucial in imaging the forefoot in assessing small and subtle derangements of the capsuloli-gamentous, myotendinous, and osseous structures of the digits.

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Plantar Capsule Tear

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  • tabitha
    What is planter plate foot fracture?
    6 years ago

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