Medial Epicondylitis

Tennis Elbow Secrets Revealed

Tennis Elbow Secrets Revealed

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Medial epicondylitis is a pathologic condition of the common flexor tendon at its origin from the medial epicondyle. Medial epicondylitis is much less common than lateral epicondylitis. Unlike lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis is seen mainly in athletes. Most individuals with medial epicondylitis are involved in sports activities that generate repetitive valgus and flexion forces at the elbow. Medial epicondylitis is believed to represent an incomplete healing response to an initial microscopic or macroscopic avulsion injury of the common flexor tendon. The pathologic condition most commonly involves the tendon origins of the flexor carpi radialis muscle and pronator teres muscle [50,51].

MRI may be useful in evaluating the common flexor tendon origin in patients with medial epicondylitis. The origin of the common flexor tendon in these patients usually is thickened and shows increased signal intensity on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. In many individuals, however, the common flexor tendon origin is thinned and shows areas of intense fluid-like signal intensity on T2-weighted images (Fig. 17). In contrast, the normal common

Axial Medial Epicondylitis Mri

Fig. 17. Medial epicondylitis in a 47-year-old male racquetball player with chronic medial elbow pain. Axial fat-suppressed T2-weighted fast spin-echo image of the elbow shows thinning and abnormal fluid-like signal intensity within the common flexor tendon origin (arrowhead). (From Kijowski R, De Smet A. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with medial epicondylitis. Skeletal Radiol 2005;34:196-202; with permission.)

Fig. 17. Medial epicondylitis in a 47-year-old male racquetball player with chronic medial elbow pain. Axial fat-suppressed T2-weighted fast spin-echo image of the elbow shows thinning and abnormal fluid-like signal intensity within the common flexor tendon origin (arrowhead). (From Kijowski R, De Smet A. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with medial epicondylitis. Skeletal Radiol 2005;34:196-202; with permission.)

flexor tendon origin usually shows homogenous low signal on Tl-weighted and T2-weighted MRI images [42,52].

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Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Cure Tennis Elbow Without Surgery

Everything you wanted to know about. How To Cure Tennis Elbow. Are you an athlete who suffers from tennis elbow? Contrary to popular opinion, most people who suffer from tennis elbow do not even play tennis. They get this condition, which is a torn tendon in the elbow, from the strain of using the same motions with the arm, repeatedly. If you have tennis elbow, you understand how the pain can disrupt your day.

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