William J. Hadlow Montana

Proven MS Treatment By Dr Gary

Multiple Sclerosis Homeopathic Cure

Get Instant Access

THE "SELLING OF THE APPLES''

Polyomavirus
Figure 2.3. Dr. Sam Chou and myself with our poster exhibit ''Polyoma-like Virions in a Human Demyelinating Disease'' at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, in Philadelphia, in 1966.

The first European recognition came from Dr. W. Bernhard, Director of the Cancer Research Institute in Villejuif, France. He was a pioneer of viral research and electron microscopy with a special interest in murine polyoma virus and SV40. Following earlier correspondence, he invited me in the summer of 1965 to visit his laboratory—and also to enjoy French cuisine! He was convinced that the glial nuclei in PML were infected by a polyoma group virus.

The acceptance of our work by Dr. Joseph L. Melnick (Baylor College, Houston, Texas) was especially gratifying. As the Series Editor of Progress in Medical Virology, he solicited from me a review article (Zu Rhein, 1969) for which I could collect 27 cases of PML with ultrastructurally proven papova virions. Of these, 19 were confirmatory studies by other investigators. No negative findings came to my attention. Data on biologic studies were scarce chiefly due to the rarity of PML cases before the advent of AIDS. The results obtained by four laboratories, some related as personal communications, were negative in their in vivo and in vitro aspects. A variety of routinely used cell lines had been employed in these attempts.

Invitations to symposia, workshops, and meetings were gladly accepted to spread the knowledge of PML to a wider range of physicians in the hope for eventual tissue retrieval. In 1966, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society assembled a workshop at the USPHS Rocky Mountain Laboratory, in Hamilton, Montana (Fig. 2.4). Representatives of virology, pathology, epidemiology, and neurology discussed ''slow virus'' diseases such as subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, PML, scrapie, and Kuru at a time when the concept of ''neurovi-

Figure 2.4. Workshop at the USPHS Rocky Mountain Laboratory, in 1966, dealing with "slow virus'' diseases. Clockwise from left: Carl M. Eklund, Hamilton, Montana; John Seal, NIAID; Gabriele Zu Rhein, Madison, Wisconsin; Ellsworth C. Alvord, Jr., Seattle, Washington; Richard T. Johnson, Cleveland, Ohio; Jacob A. Brody, NINDB, Bethesda, Maryland; Hilary Koprowski, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; William J. Hadlow, Hamilton, Montana; John Hotchin, Albany, New York; Clarence J. Gibbs, Jr., and D. Carleton Gajdusek, NINDB, Bethesda, Maryland.

Carleton Gajdusek

Figure 2.4. Workshop at the USPHS Rocky Mountain Laboratory, in 1966, dealing with "slow virus'' diseases. Clockwise from left: Carl M. Eklund, Hamilton, Montana; John Seal, NIAID; Gabriele Zu Rhein, Madison, Wisconsin; Ellsworth C. Alvord, Jr., Seattle, Washington; Richard T. Johnson, Cleveland, Ohio; Jacob A. Brody, NINDB, Bethesda, Maryland; Hilary Koprowski, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; William J. Hadlow, Hamilton, Montana; John Hotchin, Albany, New York; Clarence J. Gibbs, Jr., and D. Carleton Gajdusek, NINDB, Bethesda, Maryland.

rology'' had not yet been developed. In 1967, an international symposium on the ''Pathogenesis and Etiology of Demyelinating Diseases'' was convened in Locarno, Switzerland, with the support of a German multiple sclerosis foundation. It brought to light several Japanese cases of PML that were collected and studied, with the demonstration of virions, by Dr. F. Ikuta at Niigata University.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment