Structure and Function of the Vertebrate

The digestive tract of vertebrates is a tubular gut that runs from mouth to anus (Figure 50.10). The vertebrate gut can be divided into several compartments that are specialized for different digestive and absorptive functions. In addition, several accessory structures produce compounds that contribute to the digestive process and release them into the gut.

Parotid salivary gland

Mouth

Esophagus

Diaphragm

Liver

50.10 The Human Digestive System Different compartments within the long tubular gut specialize in digesting food, absorbing nutrients, and storing and expelling wastes. Accessory organs contribute secretions containing enzymes and other molecules.

Parotid salivary gland

Esophagus

Diaphragm

Liver

Gallbladder

Large intestine (colon)

Appendix

Duodenum Jejunum Ileum Vertebrates Colon

Tongue

Teeth

Sublingual and submandibular salivary glands

Stomach Pancreas

Duodenum

Jejunum

Ileum

Rectum

Gallbladder

Large intestine (colon)

Appendix

Tongue

Teeth

Sublingual and submandibular salivary glands

Stomach Pancreas

Duodenum

Jejunum

Ileum

Rectum

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Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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