Animals are multicellular heterotrophs

What traits characterize the animals? In contrast to the Bacteria, Archaea, and most protists, all animals are multicellular. Unlike plants, animals must take in pre-formed organic molecules because they cannot synthesize them from inorganic chemicals. They acquire these organic molecules by ingesting other organisms or their products, either living or dead, and digesting them inside their bodies; thus animals are heterotrophs. Most animals have circulatory systems that take up O2, get rid of CO2, and carry nutrients from their guts to other body tissues.

To acquire food, animals must expend energy either to move through the environment and position themselves where food will pass close to them, or to move the environment and the food it contains to them. The foods animals ingest include most other members of the animal kingdom as well as members of all other kingdoms. Much of the diversity of animal sizes and shapes evolved as animals acquired the ability to capture and eat many different kinds of food and to avoid becoming food for other animals. The need to locate food has favored the evolution of sensory structures to provide animals with detailed information about their environment and nervous systems to receive and coordinate that information.

The accounts in this chapter and the following two chapters serve as an orientation to the major groups of animals, their similarities and differences, and the evolutionary pathways that resulted in the current richness of animal lineages and species. But how do biologists infer evolutionary relationships among animals?

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Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

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