Procedures

A. Transfer of a Slant Culture to a Nutrient Broth

1. The procedure will be demonstrated. Watch carefully and then do it yourself, following directions given.

2. Take up the inoculating loop by the handle and hold it as you would a pencil, loop down. Hold the wire in the flame of the Bunsen burner or in the bacterial incinerator until it glows red (fig. 2.2). Remove loop and hold it steady a few moments until cool. Do not wave it around, put it down, or touch it to anything.

Bact Incinerator Microbiology

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Figure 2.3 Inoculating a culture tube. Notice that the tube is held almost horizontally. Its cap is tucked in the little finger of the right hand, which holds the inoculating loop.

Slant Inoculation

3. Pick up the slant culture of Escherichia coli with your left hand. Still holding the loop like a pencil, but more horizontally, in your right hand, use the little finger of the loop hand to remove the closure (cotton plug, slip-on, or screw cap) of the culture tube. Keep your little finger curled around this closure when it is free—do not place it on the table (fig. 2.3).

4. Insert the loop into the open tube (holding both horizontally). Touch the loop (not the handle!) to the growth on the slant and remove a loopful of culture. Don't dig the loop into the agar; merely scrape a small surface area gently.

5. Withdraw the loop slowly and steadily, being careful not to touch it to the mouth of the tube. Keep it steady, and do not touch it to anything (it's loaded!) while you replace the tube closure and put the tube back in the rack.

6. Still holding the loop steady in one hand, use the other hand to pick up a tube of sterile nutrient broth from the rack. Now remove the tube closure, as you did before, with the little finger of the loop hand (don't wave or jar the loop). Insert the loop into the tube and down into the broth. Gently rub the loop against the wall of the tube (don't agitate or splash the broth), making sure the liquid covers the area but does not touch the loop handle.

7. As you withdraw the loop, touch it to the inside wall of the tube (not the tube's mouth) to remove excess fluid from it. Pull it out without touching it again, replace the closure, and put the tube back in the rack.

8. Now carefully sterilize the loop. If you are using a Bunsen burner, hold it first in the coolest part of the flame (yellow), then in the hot blue cone until it glows. Be sure all of the wire is sterilized, but do not burn the handle. When the wire has cooled, the loop can be placed on the bench top.

9. Label the tube you have just inoculated with your name, the name of the organism, and the date.

10. Repeat steps 2 through 9 with each of the other two slant cultures (Bacillus subtilis and Serratia marcescens).

B.Transfer of a Slant Culture to a Nutrient Agar Slant

1. Start again with sterilizing the loop.

2. Pick up the slant culture of E. coli, open it, and take up some growth on the sterile loop.

3. Recap the culture tube carefully and replace it in the rack. Pick up and open a sterile nutrient agar slant (keep the charged loop steady meantime).

4. Introduce the charged loop into the fresh tube of agar, and without touching any surface, pass it down the tube to the deep end of the slant. Streak the agar slant by lightly touching the loop to the surface of the agar, swishing it back and forth two or three times (don't dig up the agar), then zigzaging it upward to the top of the slant. Lift the loop from the agar surface and withdraw it from the tube without touching the tube surfaces (fig. 2.4).

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Microbiology Lab Streaking Slant

5. Close and replace the inoculated tube in the rack; then sterilize the loop as before.

6. Label the freshly inoculated tube with your name, the name of the organism, and the date.

7. Repeat steps 1 through 6 of procedure B with each of the other two slant cultures provided (B. subtilis and S. marcescens).

C.Transfer of a Single Bacterial Colony on a Plate Culture to a Nutrient Broth and a Nutrient Agar Slant

1. Start again with sterilizing the loop.

2. Hold the sterile, cooling loop in one hand and with the other hand turn the assigned plate culture of Serratia marcescens so that it is positioned with the bottom (smaller) part of the dish up. Lift this part of the dish with your free hand (fig. 2.5) and turn it so that you can clearly see isolated colonies of S. marcescens growing on the surface of the plated agar.

3. With the sterile, cool loop, touch the surface of one isolated bacterial colony (fig. 2.6). Withdraw the loop and replace the bottom part of the dish into the inverted top lying open on the table.

4. Now inoculate a sterile nutrient broth with the charged loop, as in procedure A, steps 6 through 9.

5. Sterilize the loop again, open the plate, pick another colony, close the plate, and inoculate a sterile agar slant as in procedure B, steps 4 through 6.

D. Incubation of Freshly Inoculated Cultures

1. Make certain all the broths (4) and slants (4) you have inoculated are properly and fully labeled.

2. Place your transferred cultures in an assigned rack in the incubator. The incubator temperature should be 35 to 37°C. Record your reading of the incubator thermometer here. _

E. Examination of Culture Growth

1. When you have finished making the culture transfers as directed, take a few minutes to look closely at the grown cultures with which you have been working. In the Results section of this exercise, there are blank forms in which you can record information as to the appearance of these cultures, specifically: size of colonies (in mm), color, density (translucent? opaque?), consistency (creamy? dry? flaky?), surface texture (smooth? rough?), and shape of colony (margin even or serrated? flat? heaped?).

2. When the cultures you have made have grown out, record their appearance in broth or on slants, using the blank form in the Results section. Provide all the information the form requires, as in procedure E.1.

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Workbook in Microbiology, 7/e

Figure 2.5 Opening a petri plate culture. The bottom is lifted out of the top, and the top is left lying face up on the bench.

Figure 2.5 Opening a petri plate culture. The bottom is lifted out of the top, and the top is left lying face up on the bench.

Opening Petriplate
Figure 2.6 Selecting an isolated bacterial colony from a plate culture surface. The plate has been streaked so that single colonies have grown in well-separated positions and can easily be picked up.
Isolation Bacteria Plates

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This fact sheet is designed to provide you with information on Bacterial Vaginosis. Bacterial vaginosis is an abnormal vaginal condition that is characterized by vaginal discharge and results from an overgrowth of atypical bacteria in the vagina.

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  • anke
    How to inoculate slants?
    8 years ago

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