Osmoreceptors In The Hypothalamus Of The Brain Are Stimulated By

reduced. The increased blood osmolality and osmotic pressure stimulate osmoreceptors, which are neurons located in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus.

As a result of increased osmoreceptor stimulation, the person becomes thirsty and, if water is available, drinks. Along with increased water intake, a person who is dehydrated excretes a lower volume of urine. This occurs as a result of the following sequence of events:

1. Increased plasma osmolality stimulates osmoreceptors in the hypothalamus of the brain.

2. The osmoreceptors in the hypothalamus then stimulate a tract of axons that terminate in the posterior pituitary; this causes the posterior pituitary to release antidiuretic hormone (ADH) into the blood.

3. ADH acts on the kidneys to promote water retention, so that a lower volume of more concentrated urine is excreted.

A person who is dehydrated, therefore, drinks more and urinates less. This represents a negative feedback loop (fig. 6.12), which acts to maintain homeostasis of the plasma concentration (osmo-lality) and, in the process, helps to maintain a proper blood volume.

A person with a normal blood volume who eats salty food will also get thirsty, and more ADH will be released from the posterior pituitary. By drinking more and excreting less water in the urine, the salt from the food will become diluted to restore the normal blood concentration, but at a higher blood volume. The opposite occurs in salt deprivation. With a lower plasma osmolality, the osmoreceptors are not stimulated as much, and the posterior pituitary releases less ADH. Consequently, more water is excreted in the urine to again restore the proper range of plasma concentration, but at a lower blood volume. Low blood volume and pressure as a result of prolonged salt deprivation can be fatal (refer to the discussion of blood volume and pressure in chapter 14).

Dehydration

Dehydration

Dehydration Homeostasis

■ Figure 6.12 Homeostasis of plasma concentration. An increase in plasma osmolality (increased concentration and osmotic pressure) due to dehydration stimulates thirst and increased ADH secretion. These effects cause the person to drink more and urinate less. The blood volume, as a result, is increased while the plasma osmolality is decreased. These effects help to bring the blood volume back to the normal range and complete the negative feedback loop (indicated by a negative sign).

■ Figure 6.12 Homeostasis of plasma concentration. An increase in plasma osmolality (increased concentration and osmotic pressure) due to dehydration stimulates thirst and increased ADH secretion. These effects cause the person to drink more and urinate less. The blood volume, as a result, is increased while the plasma osmolality is decreased. These effects help to bring the blood volume back to the normal range and complete the negative feedback loop (indicated by a negative sign).

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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Responses

  • Quinn
    How to stimulate thirst in a person?
    7 years ago
  • Joel
    What are the osmoreceptors in the hypothalamus?
    12 months ago
  • Anne
    What hormone bonds to osmoreceptors to induce thirst?
    10 months ago
  • alison
    What Stimulates Osmoreceptors In Anterior Hypothalamus?
    7 months ago
  • Finley Clark
    Where are osmoreceptors located?
    3 months ago

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