Hot Flash Remedy report

Hot Flash Remedy report

Heres what youll discover in The Hot Flash Remedy report: The herb from central Asia that can stop hot flashes in one week! (page 17) How your brain gets tricked into firing up the furnace and how to recalibrate it. (page 6) 7 lifestyle factors that increase your odds of suffering from hot flashes. (page 19) 9 food items that bring hot flashes on fast and furious! (page 10) The bean that actually makes hot flashes non-existent for women in other countries. (page 12) The secret ingredient in your fruit bowl that extinguishes the flame. (page 17) Why 6 meals a day are better than 3 and eating more often wont make you gain weight! (page 10) How common wildflowers hold the key to shutting down hot flashes. (page 16)

Hot Flash Remedy report Summary

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Highly Recommended

The writer has done a thorough research even about the obscure and minor details related to the subject area. And also facts weren’t just dumped, but presented in an interesting manner.

As a whole, this ebook contains everything you need to know about this subject. I would recommend it as a guide for beginners as well as experts and everyone in between.

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Phytoestrogens in the Human Diet

Genistein has been promoted as a possible preventive treatment or therapy for several diseases and conditions. There are claims that it reduces hot flashes associated with menopause, that it can prevent or delay the onset of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, and that it can lower blood cholesterol levels. In each instance the potential effectiveness of genistein would be attributable to its acting as an estrogen replacement in older women, in whom the level of estradiol is naturally low. Genistein may also be effective in the treatment of certain breast cancers that require estrogen in order to grow. In this case it is theorized that the genistein, with weak estrogen activity, acts to reduce cancer growth by competing with the more potent estradiol for the estrogen receptor.

Protocol For Treatment And Followup

New hormone deficiency or deficiencies are identified by obtaining a thorough clinical history and physical examination and measurement of appropriate hormone concentrations. Fatigue, weight gain, decreased mental alertness, and constipation suggest hypothyroidism. Fatigue, orthostatic symptoms, diminished appetite, and weight loss suggest adrenal insufficiency. A decrease in libido or erectile dysfunction suggests hypogonadism in men and a change in menses (irregular menses, amenorrhea), diminished libido, or hot flashes suggest gonadal failure in women. The symptoms of GH deficiency overlap with other hormone deficiencies and include fatigue, decreased exercise tolerance, increase in abdominal adiposity, and diminished sense of well-being. Appropriate hormone studies include measurement of serum thyroxine (or free thyrox-ine, free T4), early morning cortisol, testosterone (men), and estradiol (women). Measurement of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is not helpful and may be...

Menopause

Menopause is the cessation of monthly menstrual cycles. This generally occurs between the ages of 45 and 55 years. Levels of reproductive hormones decline, and egg cells in the ovaries gradually degenerate. Some women experience unpleasant symptoms, such as hot flashes, headaches, insomnia, mood swings, and urinary problems. There is also some atrophy of the reproductive tract with vaginal dryness. Most importantly, decline in estrogen is associated with weakening of the bones (osteoporosis).

Phytooestrogens

Phyto-oestrogen (phytoestrogen) is a term applied to non-steroidal plant materials displaying oestrogenic properties. Pre-eminent amongst these are isoflavonoids. These planar molecules mimic the shape and polarity of the steroid hormone estradiol (see page 279), and are able to bind to an oestrogen receptor, though their activity is less than that of estradiol. In some tissues, they stimulate an oestrogenic response, whilst in others they can antagonize the effect of oestrogens. Such materials taken as part of the diet therefore influence overall oestrogenic activity in the body by adding their effects to normal levels of steroidal oestrogens (see page 282). Foods rich in isoflavonoids are valuable in countering some of the side-effects of the menopause in women, such as hot flushes, tiredness, and mood swings. In addition, there is mounting evidence that phyto-oestrogens also provide a range of other beneficial effects, helping to prevent heart attacks and other cardiovascular...