Chemokine Receptor Profiles Mediate Leukocyte Activity

Among major populations of human leukocytes, neutrophils express CXCR1, -2, and -4; eosinophils have CCR1 and CCR3 (Figure 15-9). While resting naive T cells display few types of chemokine receptors, some activated T cells have CCR1, -2, -3, and -5, CXCR3 and -4, and possibly others. Clearly, a cell can respond to a chemokine only if it possesses a receptor that recognizes it. Consequently, differences in the expression of chemokine receptors by leukocytes coupled with the

Neutrophil Basophil Eosinophil Monocyte w 0 w O

Neutrophil Basophil Eosinophil Monocyte

Resting

T lymphocyte

Activated

Resting

T lymphocyte

Activated

CCR1

CXR1

CCR2

CXR2

CCR3

CXR3

CCR4

Patterns of expression of some principal chemokine receptors on different classes of human leukocytes. So far the great est variety of chemokine receptors has been observed on activated T lymphocytes. [Adapted from M. Baggiolini, 1998, Nature 392:565.]

production of distinctive profiles of chemokines by destination tissues and sites provide rich opportunities for the differential regulation of activities of different leukocyte populations. Indeed, differences in patterns of chemokine-receptor expression occur within leukocyte populations as well as between different ones. Recall that TH1 and TH2 subsets of TH cells can be distinguished by their different patterns of cyto-kine production. These subsets also display different profiles of chemokine receptors. TH2 cells express CCR3 and -4, and a number of other receptors not expressed by TH1 cells. On the other hand, TH1 cells express CCR1, -3, and -5, but most TH2 cells do not.

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Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

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