Conclusions

MR imaging is an emerging technique in this field and is expected to play a role similar to that of CT. The clinical efficacy of MR imaging has been investigated, and favorable results have been reported as described in this article. High soft-tissue contrast, static and dynamic imaging capabilities, and the absence of ionizing radiation exposure represent the advantages of MR imaging over CT. On the other hand, MR imaging is more time consuming, less readily available, and more expensive [36-39]. Advantages of CT over MR imaging include greater availability, shorter examination times, flexibility in choosing imaging thickness and planes after data acquisition with multidetector row CT, and higher spatial resolution. Precise indications for MR imaging in the diagnosis of Crohn's disease and its use as a complement to CT or other imaging procedures need further investigation. Clinical management decisions might be influenced by the presence of unsuspected additional lesions that were seen only on CT or MR imaging, as reported by Fishman et al. and Turetschek et al., with management changes occurring in 28 and 62% of cases, respectively. Cross-sectional imaging should be included or even performed as a primary examination in the clinical eval

Fig.4. A 27-year-old man with active Crohn's disease. a, b On coronal true FISP images Mesenteric vessels (vasa resta) are clearly detectable depicting the so-called "comb sign" which corresponds to hypertrophied mesenteric vascularisation perpendicular to the axis of the affected bowel loop (arrow). c, d Contrast enhanced Tl-weighted gradient echo images, confirm disease activity (arrows)

Fig.4. A 27-year-old man with active Crohn's disease. a, b On coronal true FISP images Mesenteric vessels (vasa resta) are clearly detectable depicting the so-called "comb sign" which corresponds to hypertrophied mesenteric vascularisation perpendicular to the axis of the affected bowel loop (arrow). c, d Contrast enhanced Tl-weighted gradient echo images, confirm disease activity (arrows)

uation of Crohn's disease, along with conventional imaging and clinical and laboratory tests. Cross-sectional imaging should be used to evaluate for the presence of entities that indicate elective gastroin testinal surgery-e.g., marked prestenotic dilatation (severe stenosis), skip lesions, fistulae, perforations, abscesses.

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Fig. 5. Coronal (a, b) and sagittal (c) fat-suppressed true-FISP images show thickening of the bowel wall (short arrows) of the terminal ileum. Small mesenteric lymph nodes (arrowhead) are also depicted along the vessels c

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