Anthony C Dweck

CONTENTS

1.1 Aniseed Species

1.2 Plants Bearing Similar Names

1.3.1 Biblical References

1.3.2 History

1.3.3 Traditional Uses

1.3.3.1 Flavoring

1.3.3.2 Perfumery

1.3.3.3 Cosmetic

1.3.3.4 Medicinal

1.3.3.5 Aromatherapy

1.3.3.7 Animals

1.3.3.8 Miscellaneous

1.3.4 Preparations

1.3.5 Combinations with Anise

1.3.6 Pharmacopoeial Monographs

1.3.7 Legal Recognition

1.3.8 Legal Category (Licensed Products)

1.3.9 Remedies and Supplements

1.3.10 Simples

1.3.11 Safety

1.3.11.1 Contraindications

1.3.11.2 Toxicology

1.3.11.3 Pregnancy and Lactation

1.3.11.4 Adulterants

1.3.12 Deodorizing Properties

1.4 P. saxifraga and P. major

1.4.1 Origin of the Name

1.4.2 History

1.4.3 Traditional Uses

1.4.3.1 Flavor

1.4.3.2 Medicinal

1.4.3.3 Cosmetic

1.4.3.5 Animals

1.4.4 Preparations

1.4.5 Combinations with Burnet Saxifrage

1.4.6 Legal Category (Licensed Products)

1.4.7 Remedies and Supplements

1.4.8 Contraindications

1.4.9 Plants Confused with Burnet Saxifrage

1.4.10 Adulteration 1.5 I. verum Hook.

1.5.1 Origin of the Name

1.5.2 History

1.5.3 Traditional Uses

1.5.3.1 Flavor

1.5.3.3 Medicinal

1.5.4 Preparations

1.5.5 Safety

1.5.6 Legal Category (Licensed Products)

1.5.7 Adulteration

1.5.8 Plants Confused with Star Anise

1.5.9 Other Species of Anise References

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Aromatheray For Cynics

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