Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Flair Mri

More recently, FLAIR MRI has been introduced to complement conventional T2-weighted sequences. FLAIR MRI provides a very heavily T2-weighted image of brain parenchyma and nullifies the signal from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) [65]. FLAIR MRI is particularly useful in identifying periventricular and cortical infarcts which may be less obvious on conventional T2-weighted sequences because of partial volume effects and high CSF signal adjacent to the pathological region of interest (Fig. 2). Noguchi et al. identified high signal changes on FLAIR MRI, consistent with acute infarction, in 6 of 7 (86%) patients who were imaged within 3 hours of onset of ischaemic stroke [65]. Although FLAIR MRI may increase the likelihood of identifying acute carotid territory infarction compared with T1- or T2-weighted MRI, high signal abnormalities also persist on FLAIR MRI after the acute phase of cerebral infarction, and do not allow one to differentiate between recent or prior infarction. Ultimately, some in-farcts may also appear as low signal intensity lesions on FLAIR if cavitation of the infarct occurs and the

Fig. 2. a T2-weighted Turbo Spin Echo sequence at the high convexity level demonstrating equivocal high signal intensity changes in the right MCA territory; b FLAIR image at the same level demonstrating definite high signal intensity change involving the cortex in two separate gyral regions (white arrows) (Adapted from Brant-Zawadzki et al. [19]).

Fig. 2. a T2-weighted Turbo Spin Echo sequence at the high convexity level demonstrating equivocal high signal intensity changes in the right MCA territory; b FLAIR image at the same level demonstrating definite high signal intensity change involving the cortex in two separate gyral regions (white arrows) (Adapted from Brant-Zawadzki et al. [19]).

contents of the cavity approach the protein content of CSF.

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