Carbohydrate Fat and Protein Metabolism

I. The aerobic catabolism of carbohydrates proceeds through the glycolytic pathway to pyruvate, which enters the Krebs cycle and is broken down to carbon dioxide and to hydrogens, which are transferred to coenzymes.

a. About 40 percent of the chemical energy in glucose can be transferred to ATP under aerobic conditions; the rest is released as heat.

b. Under aerobic conditions, 38 molecules of ATP can be formed from 1 molecule of glucose: 34 from oxidative phosphorylation, 2 from glycolysis, and 2 from the Krebs cycle.

c. Under anaerobic conditions, 2 molecules of ATP are formed from 1 molecule of glucose during glycolysis.

II. Carbohydrates are stored as glycogen, primarily in the liver and skeletal muscles.

a. Two different enzymes are used to synthesize and break down glycogen. The control of these enzymes regulates the flow of glucose to and from glycogen.

b. In most cells, glucose 6-phosphate is formed by glycogen breakdown and is catabolized to produce ATP. In liver and kidney cells, glucose can be derived from glycogen and released from the cells into the blood.

III. New glucose can be synthesized (gluconeogenesis) from some amino acids, lactate, and glycerol via the enzymes that catalyze reversible reactions in the glycolytic pathway. Fatty acids cannot be used to synthesize new glucose.

IV. Fat, stored primarily in adipose tissue, provides about 80 percent of the stored energy in the body.

a. Fatty acids are broken down, two carbon atoms at a time, in the mitochondrial matrix by beta oxidation, to form acetyl coenzyme A and hydrogen atoms, which combine with coenzymes.

b. The acetyl portion of acetyl coenzyme A is catabolized to carbon dioxide in the Krebs cycle, and the hydrogen atoms generated there, plus those generated during beta oxidation, enter the oxidative-phosphorylation pathway to form ATP.

c. The amount of ATP formed by the catabolism of 1 g of fat is about 22 times greater than the amount formed from 1 g of carbohydrate.

d. Fatty acids are synthesized from acetyl coenzyme A by enzymes in the cytosol and are linked to a-glycerol phosphate, produced from carbohydrates, to form triacylglycerols by enzymes in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum.

V. Proteins are broken down to free amino acids by proteases.

a. The removal of amino groups from amino acids leaves keto acids, which can either be catabolized via the Krebs cycle to provide energy for the synthesis of ATP or be converted into glucose and fatty acids.

Vander et al.: Human Physiology: The Mechanism of Body Function, Eighth Edition

PART ONE Basic Cell Functions b. Amino groups are removed by (1) oxidative deamination, which gives rise to ammonia, or by (2) transamination, in which the amino group is transferred to a keto acid to form a new amino acid.

c. The ammonia formed from the oxidative deamination of amino acids is converted to urea by enzymes in the liver and then excreted in the urine by the kidneys.

VI. Some amino acids can be synthesized from keto acids derived from glucose, whereas others cannot be synthesized by the body and must be provided in the diet.

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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